Nightmares are dreams with a disturbing content. I like to distinguish the following categories: 1. Nightmares that are frightening during the dream. 2. Violent dreams, however without the expected level of pain or fear. 3. Dreams that ... Read more of Nightmares at My Dreams.caInformational Site Network Informational
Privacy
  Home - Music Terms - Music Lessons - How to Sing - Music History - Singing Choirs - Children Songs - The Voice - Advice for Singers
   Lyrics: by Arist - (HED) P.E. to BREAKING POINT - BRIAN MCFADDEN to FINGERTIGHT - FIONA APPLE to JUSTIN GUARINI - JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE to MURPHY LEE - MUSE to SARINA PARIS - SASH to THREE 6 MAFIA - THREE DAYS GRACE to ZWAN

Most Viewed

The Double-period
Distinction Between Bipartite And Tripartite Forms
Lesson 4
Causes
The Sonatine Form
The Exposition
The Recapitulation
T The Second Rondo Form
The Necessity Of Form In Music
The Third Rondo Form


Least Viewed

The Exposition
The Recapitulation
Causes
Lesson 19
Enlargement By Repetition
Repetition Of The Parts
The Principal Song
Lesson 14
Classification Of The Larger Forms
Origin Of The Name


Random Music Lessons

The Principal Song
Length Of The Regular Phrase
1 Augmentation Of The Regular Form
Species Of Cadence
The Period
Group Of Parts
3 Dislocation Of Thematic Members
The Recapitulation
Classification Of The Larger Forms
Lesson 19



Group Of Parts





In some, comparatively rare, instances, the
arrangement of perfect cadences is such that,--coupled with
independence of melodic formation and character,--the composition seems
to separate into four or more individual sections or Parts, with or
without a recurrence of the First one; or into three different Parts,
lacking the evidence of the return to the beginning. When such
irregularities are encountered, or when any conditions appear which
elude or baffle natural classification among the Three-Part Song-forms
(simple or enlarged), the piece may be called a group of Parts. The
use of this term is entirely legitimate, and is commended to the
student on account of its convenience, for all examples of the
Song-form which, upon thoroughly conscientious analysis, present
confusing features, at variance with our adopted classification. Of
one thing only he must assure himself,--that the design is a
Song-form (i.e. an association of Parts), and not one of the
larger forms to be explained in later chapters. The definition is
given in Chapter IX (on page 84).

A fair illustration of the utility of the term Group of Parts is seen
in Schumann, op. 68, No. 18. Others will be cited in the following
Lesson.





Next: Lesson 11

Previous: The Five-part Form



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 1549