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The Double-period
Distinction Between Bipartite And Tripartite Forms
Lesson 4
Causes
The Sonatine Form
The Exposition
The Recapitulation
T The Second Rondo Form
The Third Rondo Form
The Necessity Of Form In Music


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The Exposition
The Recapitulation
Causes
1 Augmentation Of The Regular Form
The Small And Large Phrases
Exact Repetitions
Evolution
Origin Of The Name
Relation To The Three-part Song-form
4 Mixture Of Characteristic Traits


Random Music Lessons

The Double-period
Length Of The Regular Phrase
Causes
Part Ii
3 Dislocation Of Thematic Members
Afterword
The Period
Part Iii
Evolution
The Phrase-group



Lesson 13





Analyze the following examples. They are not classified;
the student must determine whether the form is pure First Rondo, or an
intermediate grade between Rondo and Song with Trio. One of the
examples is a genuine Song with Trio; and one is a Three-Part
Song-form; with reasonable vigilance the student will detect these
catches. To distinguish these three designs from each other,
recollect--

That the Three-Part Song-form consists of three single Parts, fairly
similar in character, fairly small in form, and severed either by a
firm cadence, or by unmistakable proof of new beginning;

That in the first Rondo-form, at least one of the themes (if not both)
contains two (or three) Parts; and,

That in the Song with Trio, the two Songs are more independent of
each other, and more decisively separated, than are the themes of the
Rondo-form.

With reference to all uncertain cases, it must be remembered that the
more doubtful a distinction is, the less important is its decision.
These designs naturally merge one in another, and at times it is folly
to impose a definite analysis upon them.

The analysis should be as minute as possible, nevertheless. The first
step is to define the extremities of the two themes. This fixes the
coda (and the introduction, if present); the re-transition (returning
passage into the Principal theme); and the transition into the
Subordinate theme--if present. The form of each theme must be defined
in detail, as in Ex. 54:--

Beethoven, pianoforte sonatas: op. 2, No. 1, Adagio.

Op. 7, Largo.

Op. 2, No. 3, Adagio.

Op. 79, Andante.

Op. 27, No. 1, Allegro molto.

Schubert, pianoforte Impromptus, op. 90, No. 2; and No. 3.

Chopin, Mazurka, No. 26.

Chopin, Nocturnes: op. 27, No. 1.

Op. 32, No. 2.

Op. 37, No. 2.

Op. 48, No. 1.

Op. 55, No. 1; and No. 2

Op. 62, No. 1.

Op. 72, No. 1 (E minor, posthumous).





Next: T The Second Rondo Form

Previous: The First Rondo-form



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