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The Double-period
Distinction Between Bipartite And Tripartite Forms
Lesson 4
Causes
The Sonatine Form
The Exposition
The Recapitulation
T The Second Rondo Form
The Third Rondo Form
The Necessity Of Form In Music


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The Exposition
The Recapitulation
Causes
The First Rondo-form
Relation To The Three-part Song-form
2 Abbreviation Of The Regular Form
Exceptions
Modified Repetitions
Group Of Parts
The Principal Song


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Exact Repetitions
Evolution
Melody
Lesson 18
Lesson 13
Preliminary Tones
Distinction Between Bipartite And Tripartite Forms
Length Of The Regular Phrase
Phrase-addition
The Exposition



Part Iii





The recurrence and corroboration of the original statement;
the reproduction of Part I, and therewith the fulfilment of the
important principle of return and confirmation. The reproduction is
sometimes exact and complete; sometimes slight changes, or even
striking variations, possibly certain radical alterations, occur;
sometimes it is only a partial recurrence, the first few measures being
sufficient to prove the Return; sometimes, on the other hand,
considerable material (more or less related) is added, so that Part III
is longer than the First Part.

From this it appears that much latitude is given to the composer, in
his formulation of the Third Part. All that the Part has to prove, is
its identity as confirmation of the leading motive, and this it may do
in many ways, and with great freedom of detail, without obscuring the
main purpose. It is precisely this richness of opportunity, this
freedom of detail, which enhances the beauty and value of the
tripartite forms.

The following is a very regular example of the Three-Part Song-form
(Schumann, op. 68, No. 20):--


This version is as complete as it can conveniently be made upon one
single staff (chosen in order to economize space); but the student will
find the formal design somewhat more plastically defined in the
original, complete form, and he is therefore expected to refer to the
latter. Part I is an unusually regular double-period, with three
semicadences and a strong perfect cadence, on the original tonic, to
mark its conclusion; the double-bar is an additional confirmation of
the end of the Part. The second Part runs in the key of E major (the
dominant of the original key) throughout; its form is only a phrase,
but repeated,--as is proven by the almost literal agreement of the
second phrase with the preceding one, cadence and all. Part III
agrees literally with Part I in its melodic formation, but differs a
little in the treatment of the lower (accompanying) voices.

In the theme of Mendelssohn's pianoforte Variations in E-flat major
(op. 82), which see, the design is as follows:--Part I is a period of
eight measures. Part II is also an 8-measure period, ending upon the
tonic chord of B-flat major (the dominant key), as first eighth-note of
the 16th measure; the following eighth-note, b-natural, represents what
we have called the Retransition (in its smallest conceivable form), as
it fulfils no other purpose than that of leading back into the first
tone of the First Part. Part III is only a phrase, and therefore
shorter than Part I; but it corroborates the beginning, and, in fact,
the entire contents of the First Part.

The plan of Mendelssohn's 28th Song Without Words is as follows:--First
number the 38 measures, carefully. The first four measures are an
introductory phrase, or pr?lude; Part I begins in the second half of
measure 4 (after the double-bar) and extends, as regular 8-measure
period, to measure 12. Part II follows, during the same measure; its
form is a period, extending to measure 20, and closing with a very
distinctly marked semicadence on the dominant chord (chord of D). Part
III is 14 measures long, containing therefore six more measures than
the First Part; its first phrase is almost exactly like the first
phrase of Part I; its second phrase (measures 25-28) differs from any
portion of Part I, but closely resembles the melodic formation of Part
II; its third phrase is based upon the preceding one (not as
repetition, however), and is expanded to the 34th measure. The form of
Part III is phrase-group. The last four measures are codetta, or
postlude, and corroborate the pr?lude.

For exhaustive technical details of the Three-Part Song-form, see the
HOMOPHOBIC FORMS, Chapters 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15.





Next: Lesson 10

Previous: Part Ii



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