Informational Site NetworkInformational Site Network
Privacy
 
  Home - Music Terms - Music Lessons - How to Sing - Music History - Singing Choirs - Children Songs - The Voice - Advice for Singers
   Lyrics: by Arist - (HED) P.E. to BREAKING POINT - BRIAN MCFADDEN to FINGERTIGHT - FIONA APPLE to JUSTIN GUARINI - JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE to MURPHY LEE - MUSE to SARINA PARIS - SASH to THREE 6 MAFIA - THREE DAYS GRACE to ZWAN

Most Viewed

The Double-period
Distinction Between Bipartite And Tripartite Forms
Lesson 4
Causes
The Sonatine Form
The Exposition
The Recapitulation
T The Second Rondo Form
The Third Rondo Form
The Necessity Of Form In Music


Least Viewed

The Exposition
The Recapitulation
Causes
1 Augmentation Of The Regular Form
Part I
Relation To The Three-part Song-form
Exceptions
Cadences In General
Inherent Irregularity
The Rondo-forms


Random Music Lessons

The Sonatine Form
Modification Or Disguising Of The Cadence
Lesson 11
The Double-period
The Third Rondo Form
Lesson 14
The Phrase
The Exposition
Semicadence
T The Second Rondo Form



Rhythm





This word signifies arrangement,--a principle applied, in
music, to the distribution or arrangement of the tones according to
their various time-values. The system of measurement (or metric
system) furnishes tone material with all the details of division,
proportion and comparison; but this, alone, is not rhythm. The metric
system affords the basis for rational and definable rhythm, but
rhythm itself does not enter into the proposition until
differentiated factors are associated and opposed to each other.


The first measure of this hymn is, by itself, merely an exponent of the
metric principle, for it consists of three uniform quarter-notes. The
second measure, however, is a rhythmic one, because, by dotting the
first of the three beats, three different time-values are obtained
(dotted quarter, eighth, and quarter). Further, by association and
comparison with each other, both measures assume a collective rhythmic
significance.

The rhythmic disposition of the tones is to a certain extent optional
with the composer, but by no means wholly so; the rules of rhythm are
probably the most definite and obvious of all the rules of music
writing. They do not concern the analytical student intimately, but at
least the general distinction between regular and irregular rhythm
should be understood:--We have seen that the natural accent (the
heavy pulse) is invariably represented by the first beat of a
rhythmic group; and that one or two lighter pulses intervene before the
next accent appears. Further, it is self-evident that the rhythmic
weight of a tone is proportionate to its length, or time-value; longer
tones produce heavier, and shorter tones lighter, impressions. The
deduction from these two facts is, then, that the rhythmic arrangement
is regular when the comparatively longer tones occupy the accented
beats, or the accented fractions of the beats; and irregular when
shorter tones occupy the accents, or when longer tones are shifted to
any comparatively lighter pulse of the measure or group.

The rhythm of the second measure in Ex. 3 is regular, because the
longest tone stands at the beginning of the measure, thus confirming
(and, in fact, creating) the accent. The rhythm in Ex. 1 is also
regular, throughout, the light eighth-notes occupying the light third
beat, and the heavy dotted-quarter the heavy pulse (in the third
measure). Ex. 2 is strikingly definite in rhythm, because the
time-values are so greatly diversified; and the arrangement is regular.

On the other hand, the following is an example of irregular rhythm:


The longer (heavier) tones are placed in the middle of the measure,
between the beats; the tie at the end of measure 3 places the heavy
note at the end, instead of the beginning, of the measure, and cancels
the accent of the fourth measure. These irregular forms of rhythm are
called syncopation. See also Ex. 6, second Phrase.





Next: Melody

Previous: Measures



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 1365