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The Double-period
Distinction Between Bipartite And Tripartite Forms
Lesson 4
Causes
The Sonatine Form
The Exposition
The Recapitulation
T The Second Rondo Form
The Third Rondo Form
The Necessity Of Form In Music


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The Exposition
The Recapitulation
Causes
The Principle Of Extension
The Phrase
4 Mixture Of Characteristic Traits
Lesson 1
Lesson 3
The Small And Large Phrases
Enlargement By Repetition


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Modification Or Disguising Of The Cadence
Application Of The Forms
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Lesson 12
The Melodic Motive Or Phrase-member
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T The Second Rondo Form
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Causes



The Five-part Form





The repetition of the Second and Third Parts
together is sometimes subjected to changes that are almost radical in
their nature, and therefore appear to modify the form itself. These
important changes chiefly affect the Second Part, when it reappears as
Fourth Part. When the alteration of the Second Part (that is, the
difference between Part IV and Part II) is sufficiently radical to
suggest the presence of a virtually new Part, the design is called the
Five-part Song-form. The possible repetition of the First Part, it
will be inferred, does not affect this distinction in the least; it
hinges solely upon the treatment of the reproduction of Part Two.
For illustration:


The Five-Part form is illustrated in the 14th Song Without
Words;--(first, number the measures; observe that the two endings of
Part I are to be counted as the same measure, and not separately;
they are both measure 8):--Part I extends to the double-bar, and is
repeated literally, only excepting the rhythmic modification of the
final measure; Part II extends from measure 9 to 23; Part III, measures
24-35; Part IV, measures 36-47; Part V, measures 48-60; coda to the
end. The comparison of Part IV with Part II discloses both agreement
and diversity; they are, obviously, practically the same Part, but
differ in key, in form, and in extent. The comparison of Parts I, III,
and V reveals a similar condition, though the agreement here is much
closer, and each confirms the leading statement.

A more characteristic example will be found in the familiar F major
Nachtst?ck of Schumann, op. 23, No. 4, which see:--Part I extends
from measure 2 to 9 (after 1 1/2 measures of recitative introduction);
Part II, measures 10-13; Part III, measures 14-21; Part IV, measures
22-32; Part V, measures 33-40; codetta to end. The Fourth Part bears
very little resemblance to the Second, and assumes rather the character
of a wholly independent Part.





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Previous: Modified Repetitions



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