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The Double-period
Distinction Between Bipartite And Tripartite Forms
Lesson 4
Causes
The Sonatine Form
The Exposition
The Recapitulation
T The Second Rondo Form
The Third Rondo Form
The Necessity Of Form In Music


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The Exposition
The Recapitulation
Causes
Relation To The Three-part Song-form
Lesson 3
Modification Or Disguising Of The Cadence
The Period
Part Iii
Modified Repetitions
The Trio Or Subordinate Song


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4 Mixture Of Characteristic Traits
Inherent Irregularity
3 Dislocation Of Thematic Members
Lesson 3
Beats
The Third Rondo Form
Lesson 14
Lesson 8
Part Iii
The Exposition



The Melodic Motive Or Phrase-member





This, as has already been stated,
is a somewhat longer section, compounded of two or more figures. Being
thus longer, the breaks or spaces between motives are generally more
emphatic and recognizable than those between the figures, and therefore
it is easier, as a rule, to define the extremities of motives.

Melodic motives differ in length from one to four measures; by far the
most common extent, however, is two measures, and the student will do
wisely to accept this dimension and analyze accordingly, unless there
is unmistakable evidence to the contrary. The indications are
precisely the same as those illustrated in the preceding two examples
as guides for the definition of figures.

In the first of these examples the extent of the motives is proven by
each of the three given guides: the rest, which marks the end of the
first member; the similarity of melodic and rhythmic formation, which
proclaims the beginning of the second member, parallel with that of the
first; and the regular (two-measure) dimension. In Nos. 2 and 3 there
are no rests between the motives, and the melodic formation differs;
here it is the standard of two measures that defines the members.

Ex. 3 is a two-measure motive. In Exs. 2, 5, and 6, the motives are
all two measures in length.

In the following:--

one is tempted to call each single measure a motive, because of the
number of tones it contains, and the weight (length) of the final tone,
which makes a much more emphatic interruption than commonly occurs
between figures.

And in the following, on the other hand:--


the entire four-measure sentence is evidently one motive, for there is
no recognizable indication of an interruption at any point. The same
is true of the two melodies given in Ex. 8.

The following illustrates an irregular (uneven) association of
members:--


Here again, there may be a disposition to adopt the upper line of
brackets, assigning a single measure to each motive. But both here,
and in Ex. 10, the student is advised to adhere to the two-measure
standard; he will avoid much needless confusion by so doing,--at least
until he shall have so developed and sharpened his sense of melodic
syntax that he can apprehend the finer shades of distinction in the
motion and repose of a melody. Adopting the lower line of brackets,
we discover successive members of unequal length, the first one
containing two, the next one three measures.





Next: Preliminary Tones

Previous: Defining The Figures



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