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The Double-period
Distinction Between Bipartite And Tripartite Forms
Lesson 4
Causes
The Sonatine Form
The Exposition
The Recapitulation
T The Second Rondo Form
The Third Rondo Form
The Necessity Of Form In Music


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The Exposition
The Recapitulation
Causes
Lesson 12
2 Abbreviation Of The Regular Form
Exceptions
Lesson 8
Modified Repetitions
The Principal Song
The First Rondo-form


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Repetition Of The Parts
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The Recapitulation



The Trio Or Subordinate Song





The division which follows, as second
song-form, was formerly called the Trio, and it has retained the name
in the majority of examples of this form, although the old custom that
gave rise to the term has long since been discontinued. A more
accurate designation, and one that we shall here adopt, is Subordinate
Song. (Other names, which the student will encounter, are maggiore,
minore, intermezzo, alternative, etc.).

Like the principal song, its fellow (the subordinate song) may be
either a Two-Part or a Three-Part design. It is very likely to
resemble its principal song in species of measure, tempo, and general
style; and its key may be the same as that of the principal division,
or, at least, related to it. But similarity of style is by no means
obligatory, the element of contrast having become more important than
Unity, in a design of such extent. It is also usually complete in
itself, though its connection with its principal song may involve a few
measures of transitional material.


THE DA CAPO. This association of song-forms is subject to the
principle which governs all tripartite forms, namely, the return to the
beginning, and confirmation of the first (or principal) statement; not
only because of the general desirability of such a return, but because
the necessity for it increases with the growth of the form. In a
design that comprises a number of entire song-forms, it may be regarded
as indispensable.

Therefore, the subordinate song is followed by a recurrence of the
principal song,--called the da capo (or from the beginning),
because of those Italian words of direction given to the player upon
reaching the end of the Trio, or subordinate song. The reproduction
of the principal division is likely to be literal, so that the simple
directions da capo suffice, instead of re-writing the entire
division. But, here again, changes may be made,--generally unimportant
variations which do not obscure the form; or an abbreviation, or even
slight extension. And a codetta or coda is sometimes added to the
whole.

The Song with Trio is thus seen to correspond to the Three-Part
Song-form, upon a larger scale. The several Parts of the latter
become complete Song-forms. An important distinction, to which
especial attention must be directed, is the completeness of the
contents of each song-form, and their fairly distinct separation from
each other, in the Song with Trio. The significance of these traits
will become apparent to the analytic student, as he progresses along
the line of form-evolution into the still larger designs.





Next: Lesson 12

Previous: The Principal Song



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