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The Double-period
Distinction Between Bipartite And Tripartite Forms
Lesson 4
Causes
The Sonatine Form
The Exposition
The Recapitulation
T The Second Rondo Form
The Third Rondo Form
The Necessity Of Form In Music


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The Exposition
The Recapitulation
Causes
The First Rondo-form
Relation To The Three-part Song-form
2 Abbreviation Of The Regular Form
Afterword
Exceptions
The Small And Large Phrases
Modified Repetitions


Random Music Lessons

Repetition Of The Parts
The Rondo-forms
The Period
Perfect Cadence
The Exposition
The Phrase
Origin Of The Name
The First Rondo-form
Semicadence
The Recapitulation



4 Mixture Of Characteristic Traits





This process tends to affiliate
the two distinct classes of larger or higher forms, whose respective
characteristics were explained and compared at the beginning of Chapter
XVI. Upon very careful revision of this explanation, and reference to
the given diagrams, the student will perceive that the distinctive
trait of the sonata-allegro form is the section of Development which it
contains; and that of the three Rondo-forms is the absence of such a
Development. Of the mixed forms under consideration there are two: one
in which a section of Development is introduced into the Rondo (as
substitute for one of its Subordinate themes); and the other a
sonata-allegro, in which the Development is omitted, and a new theme (a
sort of additional Subordinate theme) inserted in its place. In other
words, a Rondo (second or third form--probably not the first
rondo-form) with a Development; and a sonata-allegro with a new Middle
theme, or Episode (as we have already called it).

The Rondo with Development is illustrated in Beethoven, pianoforte
sonata, op. 27, No. 1, last movement; it is the third rondo-form,
designed as follows:--

Principal Theme, Two-Part form (measures 1-24).

Transition (25-35).

First Subordinate Theme, period, extended,--or phrase-group (36-56).
Codetta (57-72).

Re-transition (73-81).

Principal Theme (82-97).

Transition (98-106). Then, instead of the Second Subordinate theme, a

Development (106-138); followed by an elaborate

Re-transition (139-166), and a regular

Recapitulation. Two wholly independent coda-sections are added, an
Adagio (derived from the third movement of the sonata) and a
Presto, based upon the Principal theme.

The sonata-allegro with new Middle theme is illustrated in Beethoven,
pianoforte sonata, op. 14, No. 1, first movement; the middle Division
contains a preliminary allusion to the Principal theme, but is
otherwise an entirely new thematic member, very suggestive of the
Second Subordinate theme of the Rondos (17-measures long,--up to the
Re-transition, in which, again, the Principal theme is utilized).





Next: Lesson 18

Previous: 3 Dislocation Of Thematic Members



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