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The Double-period
Distinction Between Bipartite And Tripartite Forms
Lesson 4
Causes
The Sonatine Form
The Exposition
The Recapitulation
T The Second Rondo Form
The Third Rondo Form
The Necessity Of Form In Music


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The Exposition
The Recapitulation
Causes
Lesson 11
2 Abbreviation Of The Regular Form
Application Of The Forms
Lesson 3
Modified Repetitions
Lesson 19
Length Of The Regular Phrase


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Lesson 4
The Exposition
The Principal Song
Causes
Time
The First Rondo-form
Lesson 11
Tempo
Modified Repetitions
Group Of Parts



Lesson 12





The following examples all belong to the Song with Trio.
They should be analyzed as usual, each Song separately, defining the
Parts, their form, and other details, as minutely as possible. Careful
analysis is the first condition of intelligent interpretation; and the
more complete the analysis, the fuller and more authoritative the
interpretation:--

Beethoven, pianoforte sonatas: op. 2, No. 1, third movement; the
divisions are called Menuetto and Trio, therefore this is an
authentic type of the present design; each is a complete Three-Part
Song-form; the key is the same, though a change from minor into major
takes place; after the Trio, the Menuetto does not re-appear (on
the printed page), but its reproduction is demanded by the words
Menuetto da capo, at the end of the Trio.

Op. 2, No. 2, Scherzo and Trio.

Op. 2, No. 3, Scherzo and Trio.

Op. 7, third movement, Allegro and Minore.

Op. 10, No. 2, second movement, Allegretto (the subordinate song is
not marked, but is easily distinguished; there are no da capo
directions, because the principal song is re-written, with alterations).

Op. 10, No. 3, Menuetto and Trio.

Op. 14, No. 1, second movement. Allegretto and Maggiore; a coda is
added.

Op. 22, Menuetto and Minore.

Op. 26, Scherzo and Trio.

Op. 27, No. 1, second movement, Allegro molto; the Trio is not
marked; the da capo is variated, and a coda follows.

Op. 27, No. 2, Allegretto and Trio.

Op. 28, Scherzo and Trio.

Op. 31, No. 3, Menuetto and Trio.

Schumann, op. 68, No. 11; here there are no outward indications of the
Song with Trio, but that is the design employed; for the subordinate
song the measure is changed from 6-8 to 2-4, but the key remains the
same; the reproduction of the principal song is indicated in German,
instead of Italian.

No. 12, No. 29, No. 39 (here the da capo is considerably changed).

In No. 37 the subordinate song is represented by no more than a brief
Interlude (measures 33-40) between the principal song and its
recurrence,--just sufficient to provide an occasion for the latter
(which, by the way, is also abbreviated).

Mozart, pianoforte sonatas: No. 2, Andante cantabile; each song-form
has two Parts; the subordinate song changes into the minor.

No. 9, second movement, Menuettos; the subordinate song is marked
Menuetto II, a custom probably antedating the use of the word Trio
(see Bach, 2d English Suite, Bourr?e I and II).

No. 12, Menuetto.

Schubert, Momens musicals, op. 94, Nos. 1, 4, and 6.

Schumann, op. 82 (Waldscenen), Nos. 7 and 8.

Chopin, Mazurkas, Nos. 6, 12, 23, 47, 50. In Nos. 10, 45, 46 and 51,
the subordinate song consists of one Part only, but is sufficiently
distinct, complete, and separate to leave no doubt of the form.

Also Chopin, Nocturne No. 13 (op. 48, No. 1).

Examples of this compound Song-form will also be found, almost without
exception, in Marches, Polonaises, and similar Dance-forms; and in many
pianoforte compositions of corresponding broader dimensions, which, if
extended beyond the very common limits of the Three-Part form, will
probably prove to be Song with Trio. This the student may verify by
independent analysis of pianoforte literature,--never forgetting that
uncertain examples may need (if small) to be classed among the
group-forms, or (if large) may be suspected of belonging to the higher
forms, not yet explained, and are therefore to be set aside for future
analysis. Mention must be made of the fact that in some rare cases--as
in Mendelssohn's well-known Wedding March--two Trios, and
consequently two da capos, will be found.





Next: Evolution

Previous: The Trio Or Subordinate Song



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