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The Double-period
Distinction Between Bipartite And Tripartite Forms
Lesson 4
Causes
The Sonatine Form
The Exposition
The Recapitulation
T The Second Rondo Form
The Necessity Of Form In Music
The Melodic Figure


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The Exposition
The Recapitulation
Causes
Repetition Of The Parts
The Principal Song
The Sonata-allegro Form
Exact Repetitions
2 Abbreviation Of The Regular Form
3 Dislocation Of Thematic Members
Tempo


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Evolution
The Melodic Motive Or Phrase-member
Lesson 8
Origin Of The Name
Melody
Cadences In General
Lesson 18
The Development Or Middle Division
Lesson 15
Lesson 7



Exact Repetitions





When Part I,--or Parts II and III together,--are to
be repeated without any changes, it is customary to employ the familiar
repetition-marks (double-bar and dots); with first and second ending,
if, for any reason, some modification of the cadence-measure is
required. This is illustrated in the 7th Song Without Words; Part I is
repeated alone, and Parts II and III together; both repetitions are
indicated by the customary signs, and each has a double ending. See
also, Schumann, op. 68, No. 1; Part I is repeated exactly, with
repetition-marks; Parts II and III are also repeated literally (all but
the very last tone in the lower part), but written out,--apparently
without necessity. Also No. 2; the literal repetition of Part I is
written out; Parts II and III have the repetition-marks.





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