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The Double-period
Distinction Between Bipartite And Tripartite Forms
Lesson 4
Causes
The Sonatine Form
The Exposition
The Recapitulation
T The Second Rondo Form
The Third Rondo Form
The Necessity Of Form In Music


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The Exposition
The Recapitulation
Causes
The Sonata-allegro Form
3 Dislocation Of Thematic Members
Lesson 1
Lesson 2
Length Of The Regular Phrase
Contents Of The Phrase
Cadences In General


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Causes
Relation To The Three-part Song-form
The Sonatine Form
The Rondo-forms
The First Rondo-form
Evolution
Preliminary Tones
The Period
Inherent Irregularity
Lesson 13



The Small And Large Phrases





If a cadence is inserted before it is
properly due, it is almost certain to occur exactly half-way along the
line toward the expected (regular) cadence,--that is, in the second
measure. This is likely to be the case only when the tempo is so slow,
or the measures of so large a denomination, that two of them are
practically equal to four ordinary measures. By way of distinction,
such a two-measure phrase is called a Small phrase. For example:--


There is no reasonable doubt of the semicadence in the second measure,
because enough pulses have been heard, up to that point, to represent the
sum of an ordinary phrase. If this were written in 6-8 measure (as it
might be), it would contain four measures. See, also, Song No. 22 of
Mendelssohn,--9-8 measure, adagio tempo; the phrases are Small; note
particularly the last two measures. The same is true in No. 17. About
Schumann, op. 68, No. 43 (Sylvesterlied), there may be some doubt; but
the measures, though of common denomination, contain so many tones, in
moderate tempo, that the effect of a cadence is fairly complete in the
second measure.

If, on the other hand, one of the regular cadences is omitted,--owing to
the rapidity of the tempo, or a small denomination of measure,--the
phrase will attain just double the ordinary length; that is, eight
measures. An eight-measure phrase is called a Large phrase. For
illustration:--

There is not the slightest evidence of repose or interruption in the
fourth measure, nor of a new beginning in the fifth, wherefore the
cadence is not expected until four more measures have passed by. The
inferior points of repose in the upper parts, at the beginning of the
5th, 6th and 7th measures, serve only to establish melodic, or rather
rhythmic, variety, and have no cadential force whatever. See
Mendelssohn, Song No. 8; the first cadence appears to stand in the
eighth measure; the tempo is rapid and the measures are small; it is
obviously a large phrase. The phrase which follows is regular, however;
there is a cadence in the twelfth measure, thus proving that Large
phrases may appear in company with regular phrases, in the same
composition. In other words, the omission of an expected cadence (or the
insertion of an additional one) may be an occasional occurrence,--not
necessarily constant. See, again, No. 22 of the Songs Without Words; the
first and second phrases are small; the third phrase, however (reaching
from measure 6 to 9 without cadential interruption), is of regular
dimensions.





Next: The Principle Of Extension

Previous: Causes



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