431. If you take a baby in your arms for the first time, and at the same time wish, you will get your wish before the year is out. Quebec. 432. Take your Bible and wish. If it opens at and it came to pass, you will get your wish... Read more of Wishes at Superstitions.caInformational Site Network Informational
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The Double-period
Distinction Between Bipartite And Tripartite Forms
Lesson 4
Causes
The Sonatine Form
The Exposition
The Recapitulation
T The Second Rondo Form
The Necessity Of Form In Music
The Melodic Figure


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The Exposition
The Recapitulation
Causes
Exact Repetitions
The Sonata-allegro Form
Lesson 2
Modification Or Disguising Of The Cadence
Repetition Of The Parts
Modified Repetitions
Lesson 16


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Modification Or Disguising Of The Cadence
Lesson 3
The Third Rondo Form
Exact Repetitions
Lesson 12
Lesson 15
The Sonata-allegro Form
Origin Of The Name
Application Of The Forms
Lesson 18



The Double-period





A third method consists in expanding the period
into a double-period (precisely as the phrase was lengthened into a
double-phrase, or period), by avoiding a perfect cadence at the end of
the second phrase, and adding another pair of phrases to balance the
first pair. It thus embraces four coherent phrases, with a total
length of sixteen measures (when regular and unextended).

An important feature of the double-period is that the second period
usually resembles the first one very closely, at least in its first
members. That is, the second phrase contrasts with the first; the
third corroborates the first; and the fourth either resembles the
second, or contrasts with all three preceding phrases. This is not
always--though nearly always--the case.

The double-period in music finds its poetic analogy in almost any
stanza of four fairly long lines, that being a design in which we
expect unity of meaning throughout, the progressive evolution of one
continuous thought, uniformity of metric structure (mostly in
alternate lines), the corroboration of rhyme, and, at the same time,
some degree and kind of contrast,--as in the following stanza of
Tennyson's:

Phrase 1. The splendor falls on castle walls,
Phrase 2. And snowy summits old in story;
Phrase 3. The long light shakes across the lakes,
Phrase 4. And the wild cataract leaps in glory.

The analogy is not complete; one is not likely to find, anywhere,
absolute parallelism between music and poetry; but it is near enough to
elucidate the musical purpose and character of the double-period. And
it accounts for the very general choice of this form for the hymn-tune.

The following illustrates the double-period, in its most regular and
convincing form (Beethoven, pianoforte sonata, op. 49, No. 1):--

Each phrase is four measures long, as usual; the first one ends (as in
Ex. 50) with one of those early, transient perfect cadences that do not
break the continuity of the sentence; the second phrase ends with a
semicadence,--therefore the sentence remains unbroken; phrase three is
exactly like the first, and is therefore an Antecedent, as before;
phrase four bears close resemblance to the second one, but differs at
the end, on account of the perfect cadence. The evidences of Unity and
Variety are easily detected. The main points are, that the second pair
of phrases balances the first pair, and that the two periods are
connected (not separate periods). See also Ex. 53, first 16 measures.





Next: Lesson 8

Previous: The Phrase-group



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