Make sure it is night when you do this spell. Also, light one orange and one pink candle. Close your eyes. (You Must Have complete focus and be concentrating on the spell, ONLY.) Fill your mind with the color your eyes are. Picture that for abo... Read more of Spell to change eye color at White Magic.caInformational Site Network Informational
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The Double-period
Distinction Between Bipartite And Tripartite Forms
Lesson 4
Causes
The Sonatine Form
The Exposition
The Recapitulation
T The Second Rondo Form
The Third Rondo Form
The Necessity Of Form In Music


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The Exposition
The Recapitulation
Causes
The Sonata-allegro Form
Lesson 2
Length Of The Regular Phrase
Contents Of The Phrase
Cadences In General
Lesson 7
The Phrase-group


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Lesson 16
Phrase-addition
The Development Or Middle Division
1 Augmentation Of The Regular Form
Causes
Lesson 17
Melody
Part I
The Third Rondo Form
2 Abbreviation Of The Regular Form



The Parts





If we inquire into the means employed, in the larger
Part-forms, to effect the division of the whole into its broader Parts,
we find that the prime factors, here again, are Cadence and Melody.
The strongest sign of the consummation of a Part is a decisive perfect
cadence, resting, as usual, upon the tonic harmony of the chosen key;
a cadence sufficiently emphatic to interrupt the closer cohesion of the
phrases which, precede, and bring them, as completed Part, to a
conclusion. Such a cadence, marking the end of the First Part, may be
verified in Mendelssohn's Songs Without Words, No. 23, measure 15; No.
3, measure 29 (at the double-bar,--a sign which frequently appears at
the termination of Part One); No. 20, measure 21; No. 27, measure 12;
No. 34, measure 10.

Another indication of the Part-form is a palpable change in melodic
character in passing from one Part into the next; sufficient to denote
a more striking new beginning than marks the announcement of a new
phrase only. The change, however, is as a rule not very marked; it
is sometimes, in fact, so slight as to be no more than simply palpable,
though scarcely definable on the page. For these divisions are, after
all, the several Parts of one and the same song-form, and, therefore,
any such radical change in melodic or rhythmic character, or in general
style, as would make each Part appear to be a wholly independent
musical idea (subject or theme), would be manifestly inconsistent.

Generally, both these factors (cadence and melody) unite to define the
end of one Part and the beginning of the next. Should either one be
feeble, or absent, the other factor will be all the more pronounced.
Thus, the cadence of Part One may be less decisive, if the change in
melodic character at the beginning of Part Two is well marked; this is
seen in No. 33, measure 12. The reverse--a strong cadence and but
little melodic change,--in No. 13, measure 20.





Next: The First Part

Previous: The Song-form Or The Part-form



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