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The Double-period
Distinction Between Bipartite And Tripartite Forms
Lesson 4
Causes
The Sonatine Form
The Exposition
The Recapitulation
T The Second Rondo Form
The Third Rondo Form
The Necessity Of Form In Music


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The Exposition
The Recapitulation
Causes
Lesson 12
2 Abbreviation Of The Regular Form
Exceptions
Lesson 8
Modified Repetitions
The Principal Song
The First Rondo-form


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The Principal Song
Perfect Cadence
Exceptions
The Third Rondo Form
Lesson 2
Lesson 7
Beats
Repetition Of The Parts
Exact Repetitions
Lesson 10



The Exposition





This first Division, the statement, compounded of
two themes and a recurrence, is in itself a complete (though probably
very concise) First Rondo-form; therefore, in order to confirm the
intended design, at least one of its themes must contain two (or more)
Parts,--otherwise it would be no more, all together, than a Three-Part
Song-form, and the whole Rondo would be reduced to the design of the
First Rondo-form. In a word, the Exposition must correspond concisely
to the table given on page 108. The First Subordinate theme takes its
usual emphatic position in a different key,--generally closely related
to the key of the Principal theme.

Sometimes, but by no means regularly, the Exposition closes with a
decisive perfect cadence in the original key.

The Middle Division.--As this should balance (at least approximately),
the Exposition, it is likely to be a fairly broad design,--not greater,
however, than a Three-Part Song-form (possibly with repetitions), and
often no more than a Two-Part form. As intimated in the preceding
chapter, the Second Subordinate theme is usually strongly contrasted
with the other themes, in character, key, and length; but the same
unity of total effect is necessary, as in the smaller Rondo-forms. The
re-transition (or returning passage) is often quite lengthy and
elaborate; it is seldom an independent section of the form, however,
but generally developed out of the last phrase of the theme, by the
process of dissolution,--to be explained more fully in Chapter XVII.





Next: The Recapitulation

Previous: The Third Rondo Form



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